News

Tech Talk

22 Aug 2017

Parents & new rowers – the following ‘Tech Talk’ may assist you in learning more about the sport of rowing (sweep rowing & sculling) and help in identifying the boats that MCCRC use.

Tech Talk

Guide to boats used by Marist Rowing Club. 

The majority of rowing done at MCCRC is sculling. This is done mainly in coxed quads.

Rowing can be split into two types: Sweep rowing & sculling. Sweep rowing or just ‘rowing’ is done with one oar which is approximately 370cm long. Sculling is done with two oars, each about 288cm long. Both types are made of carbon fibre and may have timber or carbon handles.

Each boat has a sliding seat arrangement with a foot stretcher where the feet are secured into the boat. Rowers sit facing backwards to go forwards!

 

Single Scull: is the smallest of all boats used in rowing. It is used by one athlete, with a pair of sculling blades (oars - one in each hand).

Double Scull: two rowers, each using a pair of sculling blades.

Coxless Pair: rowed by a pair of rowers, each with a single sweep oar. The athlete at the stern of the boat steers via a cable connecting the rudder to his foot-stretcher.  (MCCRC does not row coxless pairs – FYI only).

Coxed Four: four athletes rowing, each with a single sweep oar. A coxswain [cox] is on board to steer the boat.

Coxed Quad Scull: four athletes on board, each with a pair of sculling blades. A coxswain is on board to steer the boat.

Coxed Eight: is the largest of all boats used in racing. There are eight rowers on board, each with a single sweep oar. A coxswain is also on hand to steer. These boats are up to 18m long.

You can get coxless fours and quads.  However, almost all school boy events are coxed.

The cox seat may be at the stern end of the boat facing the crew, whilst in some newer boats the cox lies down in the bow of the boat behind the person in the bow seat.

 

The Rowing Stroke

The stroke is made up of 4 parts:

The Catch: in which oars are placed in the water 

The Pull Through or Drive: in which the legs are extended and the body opens up to make maximum use of the slide, levering the boat forwards

The Finish: in which oars come out of the water

The Recovery: in which the rower's body moves towards the stern in preparation for the next stroke.